Dancing Conversation Hearts

Since it is Valentine's Day is approaching this fun and simple dancing conversation heart science experiment is sure to get your kids excited.

Dancing Conversation Hearts

We received so much positive feedback from our last experiment with Conversation Hearts that we decided to do a Density Experiment with them. Do you want to see some Dancing Conversation Hearts? Let’s get started!

Little Passports

What you will need:

Since it is Valentine's Day is approaching this fun and simple dancing conversation heart science experiment is sure to get your kids excited.

  1. 8 (more optional) Conversation hearts or hard candy of some sort
  2. One can of fresh, clear soda (Sprite, 7 Up or Seltzer)
  3. 2 Cups or glasses
  4. A container (optional)
  5. Water
  6.  1tbs Baking Soda
  7. White Vinegar

What to do:

Part 1 Soda Dancing

  1. Fill the glass nearly to the top with the fresh soda.
  2. Take the four or more conversation hearts and drop them, one at a time, into the soda.
  3. What happens when you drop the hearts into the soda? Write down your observations in your journal.
  4. Watch the soda for a few seconds.
  5. What happens to the conversation hearts shortly after they’ve been dropped into the soda?
    Write down your observations in your journal.
  6. Watch the soda for at least five more minutes.
  7. What happens to the conversation hearts in the soda over time?
    Write down your observations in your journal.

Part 2 Vinegar and Baking Soda Dancing

  1. Fill the glass half full of water.
  2. Mix one teaspoon of baking soda.
  3. Add the conversation hearts.
  4. What happens to the conversation hearts in the water and baking soda? Write down your observations in your journal.
  5. Slowly add white vinegar until the glass is nearly full.
  6. Do the conversation hearts “dance” in the baking soda and vinegar mixture? Why do you think this happens? Record your observations in your journal.

Check it out in action

How it works

In this experiment, we dropped conversation hearts into a glass of freshly poured, carbonated soda. The conversation hearts are denser than soda. Remember when we observed density in different liquids? Well because the conversation hearts are denser than the soda, they should have quickly thumped to the bottom of the glass. As you observe them for a few minutes, you notice that they slowly rise. Because those carbon dioxide bubbles in the soda were sticking to the candies, once enough soda bubbles accumulate on the candy, they are lifted through the soda. Once the conversation hearts are at the top, the carbon dioxide bubbles escape into the air, which causes the candy hearts to sink once again. The process starts again causing the hearts to go up and down and appear to be dancing. Water, Baking Soda, and White Vinegar also create carbon dioxide gas creating the same effect.

LET US KNOW!

Did you try this experiment? How did you like it? Let us know in the comments section below. Share your videos and photos with us on FacebookTwitter and Instagram using the hashtag- #sciencesunday

We would love to see you doing the experiments!

PIN IT FOR LATER

Since it is Valentine's Day is approaching this fun and simple dancing conversation heart science experiment is sure to get your kids excited.

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